Ultrafast Broadband for Havant – An Opportunity

Havant Civic Society keeps a watchful, and we hope constructive, eye on Havant Borough Council’s Regeneration Strategy. We note that the strategy is framed almost entirely in terms of building projects, both commercial and residential, with little mention of the necessary underpinning infrastructure. In our modern, digital world, fast and reliable broadband is an essential part of that infrastructure and should be regarded as a utility, no less vital than roads, electricity and water. It is therefore a little worrying that the word “broadband” appears only twice in the 334 pages of HBC’s new Local Plan, currently being scrutinised by the Inspectors.

Havant Borough Local Plan

Recent developments in the telecoms world have presented HBC with an opportunity to accelerate the arrival of fast, modern broadband in our area and we are keen to ensure the Council grasps it. You too, dear reader, have a part to play.

So, what is going on?

A recent announcement by Ofcom – Ramping up the rollout of full-fibre broadband – Ofcom – has made it commercially more attractive for telecoms companies to accelerate their ultrafast broadband plans in urban areas, rather than relying on Government intervention. Ultrafast is defined by Ofcom to mean broadband with a speed of between 300Mbps – 1Gbps, though may also be used for broadband packages with speeds faster than 80Mbps. It is also often referred to as Full Fibre. This is provided through Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) technology. (By comparison, those fortunate enough to live in parts of the borough served by Fibre to the Cabinet (FTTC) will be enjoying Superfast broadband, defined as speeds of 30Mbps or higher. In practice, it is often slower.)

Local CityFibre Rollout Programme

The Ofcom announcement has prompted an eager response from network providers. CityFibre, a company that is currently installing its own FTTP network in Portsmouth, has announced plans to rollout full fibre to another 216 towns and villages across the UK between 2022 and 2025. Havant (east of the A3(M)) and Emsworth are included – see map here: Nationwide Full Fibre Rollout Programme – CityFibre. There will be a number of factors that influence CityFibre’s decisions on which areas to install first and, left to their own devices, Havant and Emsworth could quite possibly be 215th and 216th on their list. One of these factors will be the level of interest in having ultrafast broadband installed shown by residents and businesses in the targeted areas.

This rollout programme presents HBC with an opportunity to advance its regeneration agenda by proactively encouraging CityFibre to place us in the early part of their schedule. The large residential development coming at Southleigh, for example, would be an attractive business opportunity for the company and the Council will – one hopes – have an estimate of the number of businesses it expects regeneration to bring to the Borough. In turn, the presence of ultrafast broadband here will encourage businesses, especially small and home-based ones, to locate in Havant. Through enhancing homeworking capability, it will also reduce out-commuting, which is a key objective of the Regeneration Strategy. HCS therefore encourages HBC to grasp this opportunity while it exists – the CityFibre rollout programme is currently being planned and it will not be too long before it is finalised.

BT too is planning a rapid expansion of its Openreach full fibre network: Britain’s BT to build fibre ‘like fury’ after regulator’s greenlight | Reuters.  Although there is no detail available of its intended geographical coverage, there is clearly an opportunity here too for HBC to seek to encourage BT to prioritise Havant in its scheduling.

I mentioned that there is a role for you in this. First, whether you have a personal desire to improve your home broadband or not, please go to the CityFibre website and register an interest in their full fibre product: CityFibre – Residential. This is entirely without obligation but will help encourage the company to see Havant as a commercial priority. Please encourage all your friends, neighbours and work colleagues to do the same.

Also, do contact your local Councillor, to ensure he or she is aware of this issue and to encourage them to put pressure on the Council to be proactive. With a bit of effort and some good fortune, it is entirely possible we could see ultrafast broadband in our area within 18 months.

Vernon Stradling – HCS Treasurer

Regeneration update – Now this is never a good look!

If you go and look at the Havant Regeneration Programme marketing website at the moment, this is what you’ll see. A rather unprofessional window into the state of governance over the programme and certainly not the impression that HBC should be presenting to the external investors that they desperately need to attract.

But maybe there’s a bonfire behind that whiff of smoke.

On Wednesday afternoon, Feb 10th, The Cabinet of Havant Borough Council will be voting to approve the closing down of the Civic Plaza Development Project, the only part of the Regeneration Programme that actually existed as anything more than a whimsical visionary statement. The two potential development partners who’ve been waiting on tenterhooks to see whether they’ve been awarded the contract will be told that the project has been cancelled.

Regeneration Civic Plaza is dead, long live Regeneration Civic Plaza Plus. More on this later…

#rethinkhavant

Is there a future for the original IBM Havant site buildings?

Back in January, we reported on a move to list the former IBM Havant Plant buildings at what is now the Langstone Technology Park. If such a move is to bear fruit, it can’t come soon enough. Havant Borough Council’s Development Consultation Forum #48 will consider the future of this site on Tuesday 21st May at 6:00pm and the author of this piece plans to be there..

An early image of the Havant Plant, taken from the north western boundary.

The first Havant IBM manufacturing building in Solent Road has long since disappeared, demolished to make way for Havant’s first ‘out of town’ Tesco store. The building which replaced it was the long, elegant structure shown above, designed by Arup Associates and winner of the prestigious Financial Times Award for Industrial Architecture in 1972.

The IBM Information Services Ltd. building constructed on the same site, linked to the plant building by a glazed corridor and reception area, was an integral part of Arup’s design. Known internally as the Respond building, an IBM acronym that escapes me now, the building resembled a record deck with a concrete rendered lower part concealing a computer centre and a dark glazed upper part containing offices.

Sadly, the visual impact of the two original buildings in the context of the green field in which they stood has been greatly reduced by the development of the large car park at the eastern end. The original architecture contained a small car park for visitors and executives at the steps up to the main entrance in the glass link between the buildings.

The main car park was just to the south of the manufacturing plant and also included a number of temporary buildings which provided the home for two groups of systems and application programmers, one looking after the IBM manufacturing information systems, the other developing the systems which ran IBM’s World Trade business operations. To the south of those temporary buildings, past the original car park, the remainder of the land down to the shore remained undeveloped, save for playing fields and the IBM staff club on Southmoor Lane.

This shot shows the site after the second phase of development, but still before the rest of the Southmoor area had been ‘developed’. The two original buildings are the Respond building at the left of this group of four, with the IBM Plant building in the foreground. The first, sensitive extension of the plant building can also clearly be seen at the right hand, western, end. The two buildings in the background of the group are Arup’s second, later bite of the cherry. This shot shows the small visitors’ car park at the main entrance and the glass walkway between the two original buildings can still be seen.

In 1977, the new IBM UK Headquarters offices opened at North Harbour, with staff relocating from the Havant temporary buildings, the original London headquarters building in Chiswick and the single storey glazed temporary building in Northern Road, Cosham.

The Havant temporary buildings were bulldozed to make way for the second phase of the Langstone site development. The old London HQ site still exists, renamed Chiswick Tower and now home to the British Standards Institute, while the young Norman Foster’s ‘temporary’ glass building at Northern Road, Cosham, was eventually awarded Grade 2 listing and has for some years been occupied by HMRC as ‘Lynx House’.

Going back to the two original buildings at Langstone, it’s worth understanding how important this site was, both to IBM and to Havant. At the time of their construction in the early 1970s, Havant was already home to a number of global manufacturing brands, Kenwood, Colt, Lewmar and Goodmans being four other significant global brands. Minimodels, the manufacturer of Scalextric was moving out of its Leigh Park site but the Havant area was still a hotbed of technical development and manufacturing with a proven quality workforce. The existence of these brands in Havant were influential in IBM’s decision to build such an important manufacturing and development site on the Langstone site.

A little background is probably appropriate…

By the early 1970s, the IBM world was divided into two parts of roughly equal business size, IBM US and IBM World Trade, the main company product line being the IBM 370 series family of mainframe computers. Now dwarfed by the technology in our homes and pockets, these huge machines were the state-of-the-art computers of their day and were used to run the business of many of the Fortune 500 companies.

An IBM 370 series installation, including the Central Processing Unit at the back, tape drives on the left, removable disk drives on the right and printers in the foreground. The Havant Plant building and the Respond building each typically contained around four of these water cooled behemoths at any one time in secure air conditioned machine rooms, running IBM World Trade’s operational and manufacturing business.

The US arm of the IBM corporation produced all of the component parts of these systems for the North American market in a number of plants across the United States, each plant concentrating on a specific component.

For the World Trade division however, the manufacturing plants were spread around the world with the new Havant plant site building the Central Processing Units (CPUs). Other plants, notably in Sweden, Germany, France and Italy, but also in Japan, Mexico and Argentina produced peripheral components all of which were brought into the Havant Plant building for ‘systems integration’ before final shipment of the complete, tested system to the customer site.

In the 1970s, that long flat building was divided into three parts. At one end was the machine room, housing the computers that managed the manufacturing process while at the other end was a clean room where semiconductor chips were developed and manufactured. The bulk of the floor space in between was taken up by the manufacturing space for the ‘big blue boxes’, the CPUs. Hanging from the ceiling above each of the half dozen or so being constructed at any one time was a board with the name of the customer for whom that system was being built.

To those of us who witnessed this manufacturing operation ‘from the inside’, it was an impressive spectacle, a demonstration of the power and reach of the IBM corporation as a once genuinely global business.

So should the site be protected by listing?

The original buildings date from a time when Havant peaked as a globally acknowledged centre of high tech manufacturing industry. It could also be said that the time also marked the point at which IBM’s dominance of the global computer systems market peaked.

By the 1990’s, the IBM Havant plant was reduced to the development and manufacture of computer disk drives. In 1993, with UK manufacturing costs being too high, the IBM Corporation let the Havant plant go to a management buyout and the site became the home of Xyratex.

As soon as they were contractually free to do so, IBM opened a new low cost disk plant in Hungary in direct competition with Xyratex. The ethical principles espoused by Thomas Watson for IBM had been diluted and devalued by the 1990s. The creaking IBM printer business was similarly sold off in a leveraged buyout, forming the Lexmark company. Once again, when contractual constraints were lifted, IBM re-launched its own printer division using low cost manufacturing.

I’ve not seen inside the Havant Plant building since the late ’70s but feel sure that the overall architecture of the space must still be sound. As a large exhibition hall with superb transport links, it might be preserved by a far sighted owner.

But then the progressive vandalism of the last forty years of insensitive planning and development might just have rendered it beyond recovery…

I might also argue that IBM actually started the rot here by selling off its own global property portfolio in order to keep balancing the books. The relentless increase in performance of computer hardware predicted by Moores Law , coupled with the commoditisation of the computer hardware business, necessitated desperate action to keep the stockholders happy.

In the sixties and seventies, the IBM UK property portfolio displayed some of the finest architecture of the day, the Langstone site just one example. Nowadays, there’s only one site in the UK still owned by IBM, and that’s Hursley. The reason? IBM UK never owned it, it’s the property of the US company. Even that other Norman Foster building on the South Bank is now owned by Alan Sugar.

(I should point out that the rambling views in this post are personal observations by the editor and are not necessarily the views of the HCS Committee. Bob C. )

Moves to list former IBM Havant plant buildings

IBM  PLANT LANGSTONE, HAVANT The IBM Havant Plant, at Langstone, was cleverly designed to blend into its surroundings and  situated close to the newly-opened A27 (1965). Set back down a long drive and west of Bosmere Field, it was built on a grass mound, which housed various facilities.

The Plant was designed by Arup Associates and in 1972 it won the prestigious Financial Times Award for Industrial Architecture. The original office complex, including a systems assembly plant and computer centre, was completed in 1971. It was subsequently added to in the late 1970s, also by Arup Associates.

1972 ARUP TO THE FORE IN FT AWARDS                                                                    (Source: VADS Online Resource for the Visual Arts)              

‘The name of Arup looms large in the Financial Times Awards for Industrial Architecture 1972, recently announced. The winning building, IBM’s new plant at Havant, Hampshire, was designed by Arup Associates, as was one of the five commended buildings, the Oxford Mail and Times building. The parent practice, Ove Arup and Partners, acted as consultant engineers to a second commended building, Bernat Klein’s design studio in Galashiels, designed by Peter Womersley.’

Arup Associates was a major presence on the British architectural scene for more than half a century, emerged from the famous engineering consultancy founded by Ove Arup in 1946 and reflected  Arup’s  own vision of ‘total design’, formed in the 1930s in his ground-breaking collaborations with Berthold Lubetkin. With architects, engineers and other professionals working in groups, it offered a uniquely interdisciplinary approach to the design of buildings.

The former IBM Plant is an important part of Havant’s heritage and should  be  added  to the Havant Borough  List of Buildings of Local Interest.

Supporting Information and Images.
 ‘Arup Associates’ is now known as global Arup Architecture.  https://www.arup.com/expertise/services/buildings/architecture

Historic England website.https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/arup-associates/

IMAGES (Havant)       https://www.architecture.com/image-library/ribapix.html?PageIndex=11&keywords=arup

Twentieth Century Society  on Derek Sugden 

‘Sugden’s thorough experience of steelwork broadened the practice’s expertise, and he came to specialise in factories. As well as working as construction engineers, the firm was designing increasing numbers of its own buildings, and in 1963 it formed an independent multi-disciplinary practice, Arup Associates, with Sugden as one of the four founding partners. The New Museums site at Cambridge and work for IBM at Havant and Portsmouth were among his most important works.’

Havant – leading the way with electric vehicle charging

IMG_0396

If you happen to own a Tesla, you’ll be interested to know that we have an eight bay charging centre – the ‘Portsmouth Supercharger‘ – right here in the town.

Click the link for details.